Facebook (parent company of VR headset maker Oculus VR) followed suit by adding 360-degree video support in September 2015, and subsequently unveiled reference designs for its own 360-degree camera systems known as Facebook Surround 360.[2] Facebook announced in March 2017 that more than 1 million 360-degree videos had been uploaded to Facebook to date.[17] Vimeo also launched 360-degree video support in March 2017.[18]
So you’re asking yourself ‘why would you want to convert my 360 video to standard video.’ There are always instances where you want the viewers to look to the left and not miss the important parts or where a 360 video is feasible, or not how to best showcase your video. As a standard video, you are able to be the director and take your viewer along the visual journey you wanted them to see.
GOM Player provides a special feature ‘360 degree video play‘ (highlighted in above screenshot) to let you view 360 degree videos. Once you start ‘360 VR mode‘, it lets you search 360 videos from YouTube or browse them on your PC and play them. You can select desired mode from mono, left/right, and up/down to play 360 degree videos. It lets you select side view as well (front, back, left, or right) and scroll through videos. You can also use keyboard to navigate through them.
In March 2015, YouTube launched support for publishing and viewing 360-degree videos, with playback on its website and its Android mobile apps. Parent company Google also announced that it would collaborate with camera manufacturers to make it easier for creators to upload 360-degree content recorded with their products to YouTube.[13] However, in 2017, Google and YouTube began to promote an alternative stereoscopic video format known as VR180, which is limited to a 180-degree field of view, but is promoted as being more accessible to produce than 360-degree video, and allowing more depth to be maintained by not subjecting the video to equirectangular projection [8][16]

In March 2015, YouTube launched support for publishing and viewing 360-degree videos, with playback on its website and its Android mobile apps. Parent company Google also announced that it would collaborate with camera manufacturers to make it easier for creators to upload 360-degree content recorded with their products to YouTube.[13] However, in 2017, Google and YouTube began to promote an alternative stereoscopic video format known as VR180, which is limited to a 180-degree field of view, but is promoted as being more accessible to produce than 360-degree video, and allowing more depth to be maintained by not subjecting the video to equirectangular projection [8][16]
Over the last few years omnidirectional cameras have grown in popularity, and capturing 4K 360-degree videos no longer requires you to spend a lot of money on a camera. Finding video stitching software that enables you to edit your spherical videos and share them on social networks is not as simple. Professional video editing software products like Adobe After Effects or Final Cut Pro are probably among the best options for advanced 360-degree video producers, while CyberLink PowerDirector or Movie Magix Pro are better adjusted to accommodate the needs of less experienced 360-degree video editors.
Specialized omnidirectional cameras and rigs have been developed for the purpose of filming 360-degree video, including rigs such as GoPro's Omni and Odyssey (which consist of multiple action cameras installed within a frame), and contained cameras like the HumanEyes Vuze[10] and Nokia OZO, There have also been handheld dual-lens cameras such as the Ricoh Theta S, Samsung Gear 360, Garmin VIRB 360, and the Kogeto Dot 360—a panoramic camera lens accessory developed for the iPhone 4, 4S, and Samsung Galaxy Nexus.[11][12][3]
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