The setup process will then notify you of any potentially conflicting AV programs you have already installed and give you the option of uninstalling them. Again, layering multiple AV programs is generally bad practice, but if used in a corporate environment with preinstalled security software, you might have to take into consideration that 360 IS may not function properly with any neighboring security suites.
360-degree video is typically recorded using either a special rig of multiple cameras, or using a dedicated camera that contains multiple camera lenses embedded into the device, and filming overlapping angles simultaneously. Through a method known as video stitching, this separate footage is merged into one spherical video piece, and the color and contrast of each shot is calibrated to be consistent with the others.[4][5] This process is done either by the camera itself, or using specialized software such as Mistika VR or Kolor AVP that can analyze common visuals and audio to synchronize and link the different camera feeds together. Generally, the only area that cannot be viewed is the view toward the camera support.[6][7]
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