Though Mac users don't have the sheer number of software choices available for PCs, Apple fans interested in editing video are well served, by four products in particular. At the entry level, the surprisingly capable and enjoyable-to-use iMovie comes free with every Mac sold since at least 2011. iMovie only offers two video tracks, but does good job with chroma-keying, and its Trailers feature makes it easy to produce slick, Hollywood-style productions.
We're still in the early days, but the results look extremely promising. For example, a recent Nielsen study (funded by Apple) showed that viewers of a Campbell's iAd featuring new products, recipes and coupons remembered the brand "Campbell's" five times more often than TV ad respondents. Out of 53 million impressions, 1% of users that saw the ad clicked through and spent an average of nearly one minute perusing it. That number may seem small, but this is one market to keep an eye on.
Video editing is one of the heaviest tasks that a device can perform. On computers, it requires decent specs, tons of RAM, tons of storage, and some know-how on how to make it work. Phones do not have the specs or power to replicate experiences like Final Cut Pro or Adobe Premiere Pro. However, some apps can do the basic stuff pretty well. It’s even good enough for some pro vlogging with some patience. Here are the best video editor apps on Android, at least until Premiere Rush CC makes it to Android. You can also click here to see the best video editors on most platforms!
PowerDirector is one of the most comprehensive video editor apps on this list. It comes with a ton of features, including quick editing tools, various effects and other tools, and it even comes with things like a collage maker and slow motion support. The interface is relatively easy to work with and it utilizes the classic timeline editor method. It should be more familiar for those who video edit often. It’s free to download and use, but you’ll need to fork out some extra money to get all the features. This is a for real video editor, especially for larger screens like Chromebooks or tablets.

A recent example of effective appvertising is the TRON: Legacy interactive ad for the iPad. The ad runs in an inviting banner within an iPad app. Once you click on the ad, you're able to control the interaction and choose what to do next. Explore the characters? See behind-the-scenes footage? Hear Daft Punk talk about composing the soundtrack? It's all there. You can also check out local show times, download screen savers and even e-mail friends, all without leaving the ad.
The latest iPhones are quite capable of handling video editing, even if you’re editing 4K videos shot with your phone. You can easily use any of these apps to edit your videos, and get the perfect movie to share with the world. So, have you ever wanted to edit videos on your iPhone? If so, what app did you use to do it. Also, if you know of any other app that deserves to be on this list, do let us know about it in the comments section below.

Another program, VSDC Video Editor Pro, simply has too outdated an interface, making common tasks difficult. Longtime pro video editors will note the absence of Avid Media Composer, which is simply too unwieldy for PCMag's primarily consumer audience. There are a couple of more interesting applications—NCH VideoPad and AVS Video Editor among them—that we simply haven't tested yet.
Quik is from a newer generation of video editor apps. It's halfway decent if you need something simple. The way it works is you add up to 50 photos and video clips into the app. The app then analyzes them and spits out a short video from them. Quik contains about two dozen video styles and you can re-order and customize your video before you export it. It’s not nearly as powerful as something like Adobe Premiere Clip or PowerDirector, but not everyone needs something that intense. It's free to download with no in-app purchases.
We live in a mobile world. The average smart phone users spends nearly five hours every day on their devices and 92% of this time is spent interacting with apps. Whether it’s sharing information on social media or buying tickets for a concert, more activities are occurring through apps than ever before, and small businesses need to keep up with this trend. Benefits of S [...]
Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.
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